One of the most classic forms of pasta only came about in the 15th century, starting with lasagna: the strip. And it was the famous chef Maestro Martino, author of Libro de Arte Coquinario (The Art of Cooking), who proposed what was probably the first description of tagliatelle, presented as “pasta as wide as a small finger” cut “in modo de bindelle” or strings. 

Although the creation of this shape of pasta has not been officially granted to Emilia-Romagna, Bologna has nevertheless established itself over the centuries as the capital of tagliatelle. Official measurements of Bolognese tagliatelle were adopted in 1972, recognised by the Italian Academy of Cuisine: at the time of cutting (before cooking), the width must be 6.5-7 mm, and 8 mm once the pasta has been cooked. 

These tagliatelle are “grandi” (large) because they are cut a few millimetres wider than usual. We respected the traditional recipe, which includes eggs in the dough.

Ideal with 

These tagliatelle are “grandi” (large) because they are cut a few millimetres wider than usual. We respected the traditional recipe, which includes eggs in the dough.